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  2. Steve R

    attitudes towards Esperanto

    Hi Frank, 1. What is your first language? (i.e. ‘native’ language, mother tongue - if it is a language other than Esperanto) My mother tongue is English, up to the age of 5 I spoke dialect and learnt English at school 2. What other languages do you speak? I speak Hebrew, German, Dutch, Esperanto fairly fluently. Basic Welsh, and a working knowledge of Korean 3. When did you learn Esperanto? 44 years ago 4. Why did you learn Esperanto? (this can be any reason) ‘I was interested in the concept of a language without national overtones. 5. When do you use Esperanto? (e.g. in everyday situations, or on special occasions only?) I write a lot in Esperanto to esperantists around the world. I read daily and listen to podcasts, mainly Kern.punkto 6. How fluent are you in Esperanto? (as fluent as in your first language?) i can speak read and write with no problem. Though to speak I often need a few hours to get into the swing of the language 7. What role can Esperanto play in today’s world? (e.g. as an international language, or as a 'neutral' language) if people realised it is possible to learn Esperanto within a short period of time and be able to communicate better than a person who has studied a language for a few years then inter European communications would improve 100%+ within 6 months. i once worked a 7 night stretch with a friend who spoke fairly good Latin. She agreed she would try Esperanto for the week we were on duty together. At the end of the week we were using Esperanto 90% of the time. 8. What do you think of the claim that the only real international language is English, instead of Esperanto? having lived in Sittard and having been told everyone spoke Engels, I soon learned “speak Dutch or die” not everyone speaks English and when they do it’s often impossible to work out what they are trying to say. I’m fairly well travelled and have found that few people actually have a good command of English apart from those who have used it continually in their employment. I’m looking forward to your replies. Bondezirojn Frank Frank van Splunder PhD Linguapolis / University of Antwerp ‘
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  5. The University of St Andrews is inviting candidacies for a PhD studentship as part of its project “Esperanto 4.0: Millennials and the global Esperanto movement in historical and anthropological perspective”. The deadline for applications is May 25, 2019. Details are here.
  6. Earlier
  7. arielbonkorpa

    Bristol Esperanto Course

    until
    Always wanted to learn Esperanto but were afraid to make the jump? Interested to know what Esperanto culture is actually like? Tired of telling Duolingo for the millionth time that the orange dogs eat rice? Then this course is for you! Ariel Bonkorpa, the president of Young British Esperantists, is an experienced language teacher and long-time Esperanto speaker. She has written blogs, short stories, and erotic poetry in the language, and has given talks and classes at Esperanto events from Slovakia to Japan. The main goal of the classes is to be fun. Ariel’s teaching style is based on contemporary research into language learning, based around the concepts of comprehensible input (basically, understanding what the teaching is saying) and a lively classroom atmosphere. So be prepared to talk, laugh, tell stories, and have an all around good time! Unlike the language classes you dreaded at school, there will be no tedious grammar drills or long asides in English here. So what are you waiting for? Go to jeb.org.uk/bristol to sign up and get to know the world’s most intriguing language!
  8. Tim

    Trustees elected for 2019-20

    Elections for trusteeship were held at today's AGM. All seven candidates were elected. Name (for/against/abstain) Ian Carter (43/5/3) Edmund Grimley Evans (48/0/3) Clare Hunter (50/1/0) Damon Lord (44/3/4) Lajo Miller (42/3/6) Ed Robertson (48/3/0) Richard Smith (45/1/5) Ian Carter was re-elected president of EAB.
  9. Ferchei

    Ferchei

  10. Frank

    attitudes towards Esperanto

    Hi Mikeo Thanks a lot for your comments. I think you made a good point about English being the de facto language of science while at the same time it may be difficult to understand some of the stuff which is being written in English. As you pointed out, the cultural and historical baggage associated with English could even dissuade some people from using it. The question remains, of course, whether Esperanto can fill this gap. Frank
  11. Vilĉjo Walker

    La Brita Esperantisto 986

    Jen bagatela komento pri legebleco: en paĝoj 32 tra 34, estis malfacile (por mi) legi (en la papera eldono) la maldikan hel-purpuran tekston sur hel-purpura fono. Necesis forta lumo kaj fortaj okulvitroj! Ĉu en venontaj numeroj, vi bonvolu uzi pli kontrastajn kolorojn por la teksto - precipe kiam temas pri maldika teksto sur bilda/grafikaĵa/kolora fono?
  12. Mikeo Seaton

    attitudes towards Esperanto

    English. Other than Esperanto, the only other language I can speak with some confidence is German, which I learnt at school to A-level. I also used to learn French (also at school) and Welsh (independently), but I am very rusty in both of these languages. I started to learn Esperanto in 1994 (at the age of 13). Because it was free to do so ... I had a book called 'Free Stuff for Kids' and one of the things I could do was 'learn another language', which involved writing to the Esperanto Association of Britain and asking to try out their Free Postal Course. (I was also generally curious about languages at that point anyway, so it was almost a no-brainer to write in and try it out.) Mainly only when I meet other Esperanto speakers (not as often now as a few years or so ago), although I have also recently started translating subtitles in YouTube videos into Esperanto, which helps me practice my vocabulary. I am not quite as fluent in Esperanto as my first language, but I can hold conversations about various topics (including some more specialist ones) reasonably well. I reckon my fluency now is similar to the fluency I had in German at A-level (which was 20 years ago): I don't think my spoken fluency in Esperanto has deteriorated nearly as much as my German has. (I have generally been better at written rather than spoken communication in any language.) I think it has some value as a social international language: its adoption for official purposes has not really happened to date, but it can still help people from different countries to meet each other. (This assumes, of course, there are Esperanto speakers that one would actually like to speak with!) I don't think that statement is true. Aside from the fact that only around 10% of the world's population can speak English (albeit more widely spread across the world than, say, Mandarin Chinese) and it happens to be very difficult to learn (even as a native speaker), there is a fair amount of cultural and historical baggage associated with English that could dissuade people from learning it. In any case, co-opting an unplanned (national or even regional) language intentionally as an international one is fraught with difficulties. I work as a scientist and most published journal articles tend to be written in English - while that would suggest English as a de facto language of science, the language quality in articles can vary massively depending on where the authors are based. I have had to peer review several articles before publication, and sometimes just trying to understand what the authors are attempting to explain can be very difficult! I would also add that I believe the implied claim in that statement that there can only be one international language is incorrect. Not only are other 'national' languages (e.g. Spanish, Portugese, French) used comparatively widely, but Esperanto is not the only language planned for international communication (although it does seem to have stuck around longest after its creation). Other created languages also exist (e.g. Ido, Interlingua), and someone might come up with something even better than Esperanto in the future. (That is not a reason not to learn Esperanto, though!) The fact that it was designed as an international language, it has comparatively regular grammar, it can be learned quickly compared to other languages, it has a truly international culture that can come with it. Not really, no ... I happen to speak Esperanto, but my personal identity is not defined by the languages I can speak.
  13. Pro tio, ke numero 986 (printempo 2019) de La Brita Esperantisto estis alŝutita por membroj, numero 985 (aŭtuno 2018) nun estas publike elŝutebla.
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    La Brita Esperantisto 986 de printempo 2019
  15. Vilĉjo Walker

    La Brita Esperantisto 985

    La malnova arkivo (1997-2018 printempo) ankoraŭ troveblas ĉi tie: https://legacy.esperanto.org.uk/lbe/index.html
  16. BillChapman

    Pioneers of Esperanto in Dover

    Nedankinde. Mi esperas eldonigi post du monatoj tutan libron pri la frua historio de Esperanto en Britio.
  17. Steve R

    Pioneers of Esperanto in Dover

    Dankon por la tre interesa informo pri la unua kongreso en dovro. Ĝi faros niajn kunkongreson pli signifoplena por mi.
  18. Rico

    Lernu & Lernu Plu in August 2019

    Ne gravas kian Tim vi havos.. vi multe lernos kaj multe amuzos vin ĉiaokaze. 🙂
  19. They keep coming! Ariel Bonkorpa (Lernu) and Tim Morley or Owen (if one can't make it the other has agreed to) (Lernu Plu) will be at EAB's headquarters leading FREE sessions on August 10-11. These are experienced Esperanto speakers with lots of teaching experience; you're in good hands! Details
  20. Tim

    Lernu Plu

    until
    A FREE session for total new people who have learned a bit of Esperanto, who have maybe completed a course or two, and who want to improve. The course takes place at EAB's headquarters and is led by Tim Schrödinger(*). This course is perfect for people who have a reasonable understanding of Esperanto but who haven't had much if any opportunity to speak it out loud or meet other learners. Details and sign-up form. (*) Tim Schrödinger is Tim Morley and Tim Owen. Calendars are being confirmed at the moment and if one can't make it, the other will. Confused by our choice of name? Schrödinger's Cat)
  21. Tim

    Lernu

    until
    A FREE session for total new beginners learners at EAB's headquarters, led by Ariel Bonkorpa, who is president of Junularo Esperantista Brita. This course is perfect for people who have only done a little bit of Esperanto but who haven't necessarily finished a course. Details and sign-up form.
  22. After a successful Lernu and Lernu Plu at the end of March, we've set up another session, this time in June! Anna Lowenstein (Lernu) and Harry Barron (Lernu Plu) will be at EAB's headquarters leading FREE sessions on June 15-16. Both are very experienced teachers and are in regular contact with new learners. You're in good hands! Details
  23. Tim

    Lernu Plu

    until
    A FREE session for total new people who have learned a bit of Esperanto, who have maybe completed a course or two, and who want to improve. The course takes place at EAB's headquarters and is led by Harry Barron. This course is perfect for people who have a reasonable understanding of Esperanto but who haven't had much if any opportunity to speak it out loud or meet other learners. Details and sign-up form.
  24. Tim

    Lernu

    until
    A FREE session for total new beginners learners at EAB's headquarters, led by Anna Lowenstein, author of several books, including The Stone City and La teorio Nakamura. This course is perfect for people who have only done a little bit of Esperanto but who haven't necessarily finished a course. Details and sign-up form.
  25. Rico

    Kafo, Kuko kaj.... Esperanto!

    until
    La monata renkontiĝo de la Esperanto klubo de Reading kaj Berkshire. Vizitu nin, parolu Esperante, pasigu kelkajn horojn kun ni. Ni antaŭguas renkonti vin.
  26. An affectionately written biography of Ludoviko Zamenhof, originally written in Esperanto by Marjorie Boulton in 1962. It was unavailable for many years until EAB decided to reissue it in 2017 on the occasion of the centenary of Zamenhof's death. 

    (Please note that this book is the Esperanto version not the English one.)

    ***
    EAB, Barlaston, 2017 (2nd edition), 368p, 23cm. ISBN 9780902756373.

    £10.50

  27. An original murder mystery written in Esperanto by Julian Modest.

    When a talented engineer goes missing, private detective Janko Sinapov investigates and discovers a sinister murder plot. 

    ***
    Espero, Slovakio, 2018, 100p, 18cm. ISBN 9788089366866.

    £6.00

  28. Rusoj loĝas en Rusujo estas libro kunordigita de Anna Löwenstein kaj eldonita en 2007 de Federazione Esperantista Italiana. Ĝi konsistas el diversaj eseoj de dek aŭtoroj pri landnomoj kaj problemoj kiuj rezultiĝas de la uzo de la nefundamenta sed fakte norma pseŭdosufikso -io. La titolo devenas el ekzerco en la Fundamento de Esperanto, kiu instruas pri la formado de landnomoj de popolnomoj.

    ***

    FEI, Milan, 2007, 95p, 21cm.

    £9.00

  29. Edited by one of the most eminent Esperantists, William Auld, this follow-up to Zamenhof's Fundamenta Krestomatio is a vast panorama of texts drawn from the whole history of Esperanto; stories, outstanding translations, scientific and linguistic essays, poems about Esperanto and an anthology of poetry from 73 languages.

    ***
    UEA, Rotterdam, 1991, 510p, 21cm. ISBN 9290170433.

    £7.75

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