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  1. 1 point
    The names and addresses of three early speakers of Esperanto in Buckinghamshire, with their registration numbers are found in the Adresaro de Esperantistoj (collection of addresses of Esperantists) between January 1902 to January 1903 (Series XXIII) to January 1908 to January 1909 (Series XXIX). Here are the names of those Buckinghamshire pioneers of over a century ago: 1904: Arthur C. Boorman, "Dovercourt", Priory Avenue, High Wycombe, Bucks, Anglujo 1906: C. S. Senior, The Rectory, Lillingstone, Lovell, Buckingham, Anglujo 1908: R. Bull, Castle House Buckingham, Bucks, Anglujo The following advertisement appeared in Buckingham Express on Saturday 12 September 1908: BUCKINGHAM ESPERANTO WEEK! KEEP SEPTEMBER 28TH TO OCTOBER 2ND FREE FOR ESPERANTO ! KEEP "THE ENTENTE CORDIALE" WITH ALL NATIONS!! PROFESSOR CHRISTEN , F.B.E A Will deliver an Introductory Lecture on the International Language, on MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28TH, AT 8 P.M.. IN THE TOWN HALL, BUCKINGHAM CHAIRMAN - REV. C.J. SENIOR, M.A., M.B.E.A. Rector of Lillingstone Lovell Reserved seats,1s. Second seats, 6d. Admissioon, 3d. Tickets at Marsh and Co., Market-square, and Mr Hartland, West Street. On Saturday 3 October 1908 Buckingham Advertiser and Free Press reported ESPERANTO. THE NEW INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE On Monday evening last, Professor Christen gave a lecture and demonstration on the International language, Esperanto, in the Small Hall. Buckingham. The H Rev. C.J. Senior. Idllingstone l/ovell. presided over fairly good audience, who were deeply interested in the remarks of the lecturer. Professor Christen said that he had no doubt that on this very day many thousands of people all over the world had been in sore predicament by being unable to express themselves to those whom they met. They might safely say that they would not take a newspaper but they would find some evidence ot the very astonishing advance in the spirit of internationalism. Alxsolutely everything—science, philanthropy, religion, commerce, industry, every department of life—was driving them towards inter- nationalism ... At the close of the lecture, a vote of thanks was accorderd to the Chairman, on the proposition of Dr Bruce Pearson and seconded by Mr Guy Lucas. During the week demonstrations were given in the Oddfellows' Hall on the new language. Despite the week's activities, I cannot find any trace of an Esperanto society meeting in Buckingham.
  2. 1 point
    The names and addresses of eight early speakers of Esperanto in Birkenhead are found scattered throughout the Adresaro de Esperantistoj (directory of Esperantists) between 1889 and 1908. The following are listed in Anglujo, i.e. England. Here are the names of those Birkenhead pioneers of over a century ago: 1889: C. K. Fletcher, 138 Oxton Road, Birkenhead. An. 1889: B. G. Geoghegan, 25 Balls R-d, Birkenhead, An. 1889: R. Geoghegan, 14 Prince's Terrace, Claughton, Birkenhead, An. 1905: F-ino (=Miss) Kate Craven, 13, Reedville, Birkenhead, Anglujo 1905: P. W. Hawkes, 93, Park road South, Birkenhead, Anglujo 1906: Ransford Joseph Fer, 134, Peel Street, Tranmere, Birkenhead, Anglujo 1908: F-ino (=Miss) E. E. Hodson, 21, Pearson Rd., Birkenhead, Anglujo 1908: Jom Griffiths , 77 Claughton Rd., Birkenhead Anglujo Not much is known to me about many of those listed, although some are to be found in post office directories. Ransford Joseph Fer was born in about 1880, and was a clerk for an oil merchant in 1911. Listed with him, and presumably recruited by him, is Richard Geoghegan’s mother B.G. (Bessie Gertrude) Geoghegan of Birkenhead. Richard Henry Geoghegan (1866 –1943) was born and brought up in Birkenhead. The Dictionary of Irish Biography suggests that he was also known as ‘Harry’. The English Wikipedia tells us that “In the Unua Adresaro, the earliest directory of supporters of Esperanto, Richard Geoghegan appears as number 264.” It goes on to call him, under a photo, “first Esperantist in the English-speaking world”. The Esperanto Vikipedio makes a more cautious claim, calling him “ŝajne la unua angle parolanta esperantisto” (apparently the first English-speaking Esperantist). The booklet called, in full, Adresaro de la personoj kiuj ellernis la Lingvon « Esperanto », serio 1, 1889, does indeed list the first thousand learners, but it does not ascribe numbers to them, nor is there any indication that these names are listed in order of registration; indeed they are in alphabetical order. Giving his new address in Tacoma, Washington seven years later, Geoghegan gives himself the number 264 - see “Novaj Esperantistoj” Serio XVI, 1896, but numbers were not published for the first thousand. Richard Geoghegan suffered a fall at home as a small child, as a result of which he was crippled for life, walking with difficulty and often with the help of crutches or a cane. From an early age he displayed extraordinarily great abilities, especially in the learning of languages – perhaps as a compensation for his inability to be physically active. Despite his education being disrupted by medical treatment – we know from the 1881 Census that on census night he was at the Sanatorium for Children in North Meols, Lancashire – around the age of 17, he became interested in oriental writing systems and entered the University of Oxford, in January 1884, to study Chinese. There he showed himself to be an outstanding student, twice receiving scholarship awards, but he did not obtain a degree because at Oxford, there was no degree in Chinese until 1936. In the autumn of 1887, when the language Esperanto had just appeared, according to Richardson (Shamrocks on the Tanana, 2009) it was not Geoghegan himself but his friend Walter J. Crawhill, who read about the new international language and immediately wrote to Dr L.L. Zamenhof in Latin. Geoghegan was able to use the German edition of the Unua Libro (First Book) which Zamenhof sent. Having learned the language from this booklet, a while later Geoghegan received from Zamenhof the first copies of the same booklet in an English translation by a Warsaw enthusiast. Geoghegan warned Zamenhof that this translation was a poor one, probably not by a native speaker, and it would bring Esperanto into disrepute in the English-speaking world. As a result, Zamenhof asked Geoghegan to produce a more suitable translation himself, which he did. The original faulty translation was withdrawn, and in 1889 Geoghegan's version was published, tasking the place of the earlier version. This modest booklet had an impact in the English-speaking world, making Zamenhof’s new language accessible by people who had no previous background in language learning. Although Richard Geoghegan presented himself as an Irishman, and his father was an Irish Protestant, his mother was certainly English, and he was born in Birkenhead, lived briefly in Kent and went to secondary school in Pudsey, near Leeds, then to Oxford University. In this respect Geoghegan’s life paralleled that of Saunders Lewis (1893 - 1985), born John Saunders Lewis in nearby Wallasey. After an English education, Lewis went on to be a Welsh poet, dramatist, historian, literary critic, and a prominent Welsh nationalist and a founder of the Welsh National Party (later known as Plaid Cymru). The Geoghegans (Gertrude with sons Richard and John, known as Jack, and two daughters), emigrated from Liverpool to Washington State, USA in April 1891, settling in Eastsound. Here, while working as a secretary / stenographer, Geoghegan became a founder of and a leading light in the Washington State Philological Society. It was in North America in the 1890s that Geoghegan spoke Esperanto for the first time. Until then the language had been a written one only for him. The first person he spoke to in the language was a German called Wilhelm Trompeter. Geoghegan moved to Alaska to act as Stenographer to an ambitious lawyer and politician, and it was here that he died on October 27, 1943. He had married a woman of black or of mixed-race descent in secret in 1916. This son of Birkenhead remains virtually unknown today, but he was a man who overcame a handicap to make a useful contribution to linguistics, and to Esperanto in particular. Bill Chapman
  3. 1 point
    Birmingham with its thousands of small workshops practising a wide variety of specialised and highly skilled trades, encouraged exceptional levels of creativity and innovation and provided a diverse and resilient economic base for industrial prosperity. Its resulting high level of social mobility also fostered a culture of broad-based political radicalism, which under leaders from Thomas Attwood to Joseph Chamberlain was to give it a political influence unparalleled in Britain outside London, and a key role in the development of British democracy. It is perhaps unsurprising that the new planned language Esperanto attacted adepts here. 1903: Frederic William Hipsley, Fernleigh, Highbridge road, Wylde Green, Nr Birmingham Anglujo 1903: Francis Henry Potts, 4 Handsworth Wood Road, Birmingham Anglujo 1903: Adolf Schlichter, 300 Belgrave Road, Birmingham, Anglujo 1903: Thomas E. Woodward, 123 Hockley str., Birmingham Anglujo 1904: W. Arthur Williams, 6 Anderson Road, Erdington, Birmingham Anglujo 1904: Eric E. Westbury, 60 Bournbank road, Selly Oak, Birmingham Anglujo 1904: H. E. White, Teneriffe, Forest road, Moseley, Birmingham, Anglujo 1905: F-ino (=Miss) E. Mary Edwards. 3 Lloyd St., Small Heath, Birmingham Anglujo 1905: A. Palmer-Jones, 249 Aston Lane, Perry Barr, Birmingham, Anglujo 1905: W. H. Thos. Partridge, "Elsimre" Grove Lane, Handsworth BIRMINGHAM Anglujo 1906: Joseph H. Dixon, The Hermitage, Four Oaks , Birmingham Anglujo 1906: F-ino (=Miss) Mary G. Clarke, 17 Strensham Road Birmingham Anglujo 1906: G. Arncliffe Percival, 127 Westminster Road, Birchfield, Birmingham Anglujo 1906: W. C. Amery, 9 Temple Street, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: William E. Turner, 261 Ickneild St, Hockley, Birmingham Anglujo 1906: F-ino (=Miss) Emily Cattell, 11 Wood St, Ladywood, Birmingham Anglujo 1906: J. J. Shield, 20 High Street, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: W. T. Fennell, 42 Stockfield Rd, Tysley, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: David Aughtie, 41 Ettington Rd, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: P. Stanley Beaufort, The Studio, Easy Row, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: Vivian Erwood Robson, 111 Park Road, Aston, Nr. Birmingham Anglujo 1906: Daniel J. O'Sullivan, Ivy Bank, 19 Brougham Street, Handsworth, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: E. H. Moreton, 20 Murdock Road, Handsworth, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: S. W. Keyte, "Fairfield" Eastern Road, Selly Park, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: James G. Beauchamp, 270 Tiverton Rd, Selly Oak, Birmingham, Anglujo 1906: H. Grant, 5 Elvetham Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham Anglujo 1907: J. W. Ord, 131 Hubert Road Bournbrook (apud Birmingham), Anglujo 1907: N. M. Bloore, 150 Pershore Street, Kings Norton, Birmingham, Anglujo 1907: D. W. M. Hall, 270 Tiverton Road, Selly Oak, Birmingham, Anglujo 1907: Wilfrid Owen, Oscott College, Birmingham Anglujo 1907: J. O. Wall, Oscott College, Birmingham Anglujo 1907: W. H. Garbutt, 3 Weatheroak Road, Sparkhill, Birmingham Anglujo 1907: H. A. Brown, Mountfield, Chantry Rd, Moseley, Birmingham Anglujo 1907: Harry T. Hall, 208 Pershore Rd, Stirchley, Birmingham Anglujo 1907: E. B. Walker, Christchurch Vicarage, Summerfield. Birmingham Anglujo 1907: Howard Durnell, 52 Newton Road, Sparkhill, Birmingham Anglujo. 1907: T. K. Yang, 32, Salisbury Bd., Hadworth, Birmingham Anglujo 1907: T. J. Perry, 21 Mansen Road, Sparkhill, Birmingham Anglujo 1907: Fino (=Miss) H. L. Robins, 48 Esmé Road, Sparkhill, Birmingham, Anglujo 1907: A. Watton, 227 Nineveh Road, Birmingham Anglujo 1908: A. N. Lloyd, St Ambrose Vicarage, Birmingham. Anglujo 1908: D. Derrington, Tufa Mount, Sth. Yardley, Birmingham, Anglujo.. Not much is known to me about many of those listed, although some are to be found in post office directories. A striking exception is Frederic William Hipsley. He was an Esperantist and civil engineer born in 1876 in London. In the 1911 census he is describes as a “land surveyor sewage disposal”. He was a lifelong member of the international body Universala Esperanto-Asocio (founded in 1908), a secretary of Birmingham Esperanto Society, secretary and later president of the Midlands Esperanto Federation. According to Ancestry.com he died in 1959. As a Quaker and therefore a Conscientious Objector, he served in the Friends' Ambulance Unit during the First World War. He translated a number of devotional texts from English into Esperanto. Hipsley was the translator of “O Love That Wilt Not Let Me Go” (Ho Am', tenanta min konstante) into Esperanto. Francis Henry Potts (born abt 1864), the son of a solicitor, was a commercial clerk at the time of the 1901 census. Adolf Schlichter was born about 1854 in Germany and died in 1913. He was a Manufacturers' Agent in the 1890 and 1892 Kelly´s Directory of Birmingham. He is described as a “Traveller” in the 1913 Kelly´s Directory of Birmingham. Arthur Lloyd was curate-in-charge of St. Mary & St. Ambrose from 1891 to 1915. This church was a daughter parish to St Bartholomew's Church, Edgbaston. The D. Derrington listed was, I believe, Edwin David Derrington (1887-1968). In 1911 he was an assistant at builder’s merchant in his father's business. W. T. Fennell (1873 – 1928) was described as “strip caster German silver” in 1901, while David Aughtie (1877-1968) was a schoolmaster. William Samuel Keyte (1875 – 1947) was a solicitor’s clerk. WE can trace the travels of Norman Margetts Bloore (1879 - 1955) to Canada where he is described as a theological student, as a chef in the Canada Census of 1911. He then moved south to the United States, where he was employed by the Salvation Army as a book keeper and then as a minister. James George Beauchamp (1877 – 1955) was describes as a “gun barrel filer” in 1901. Clearly those interested in the language, although spread over the city, came together from time to time. According to an inside cover of The British Esperantist magazine for 1908 an Esperanto Society in Birmingham had been founded in September 1906. Its secretary in 1908 was W.E. Turner of 6 Monument Road and the President is listed as P. Galloway. The Birmingham Esperantists succeeded in meeting throughout the First World War.
  4. 1 point
    My name's John Smith and I want to volunteer to do all sorts of things. This isn't a real person, by the way. I'm just being used for testing. Feel free to add your own services!
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